Multitasker's Art Resources

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kitfoxhawaii:

Just figured out how to transfer images onto wood with wax paper! YOU TOO WILL NOW DRINK FROM THE GOBLET OF THIS GLORIOUS KNOWLEDGE!

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1. Get a relatively smooth piece of wood.  FINISHED SURFACES SHALL LEAD THEE TO GLORY. Raw, ragged wood shall BEHEATHENIZE YOUR DESIGN!

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2. Sheet of wax paper. YOUR LIFE, YOUR BRAND.

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3. LEARN FROM MY MISTAKES, WONTON KNAVES. I inserted the wax paper directly into my printer BUT I WAS A FOOLISH FOOL. Tape it to computer paper and you shall win the day!

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4. Print out your image (FLIP IT IF THERE IS TEXT or you shall rue I SAY RUE!) and separate the wax paper from the computer paper.  Lay it on top of the wood, inked side down, and deep tissue massage the design into the wood using a credit card or whatnot.

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5. PEEL BACK THAT PAPER OF WAXEN SUBSTANCE AND MARVEL AT THY GLORIOUS CREATION!

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MAY OUR HOUSES NOW BE THE MOST SWAG!   AAAHHHAHAHAHAAAA!

Filed under diy crafts

424 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Wedding Ensemble
c.1900
Turkey

This is a detail from the front opening of a gown said to have been worn by a bride at her wedding, but it is not designed for movement or necessarily for close inspection. It is made from a length of green silk been embroidered with couched metal thread and lines of glittering sequins, in a floral pattern that had been printed or drawn on the fabric. The silk was cut into the pieces required for the robe. Cutting and seaming through embroidery seems like sacrilege in an age and culture where hand-decoration is expensive, but it is not an uncommon practice where labour is relatively cheap. The edges have been decorated with an elaborate trimming of metal thread that has been twisted and stitched into a complex floral motif. As the silk has no backing the trimming is floppy and reveals the unsightly tacking stitches that hold the individual metal threads in place. However, this is a presentation gown in which the wearer was expected to stand perfectly still. This style of garment is designed to trail on the floor, with each panel elegantly arranged over and around the woman’s feet. With the bride immobilized in this way, each part of the trimming could be carefully adjusted to create a breathtaking vision of green and gold.

V&A

fashionsfromhistory:

Wedding Ensemble

c.1900

Turkey

This is a detail from the front opening of a gown said to have been worn by a bride at her wedding, but it is not designed for movement or necessarily for close inspection. It is made from a length of green silk been embroidered with couched metal thread and lines of glittering sequins, in a floral pattern that had been printed or drawn on the fabric. The silk was cut into the pieces required for the robe. Cutting and seaming through embroidery seems like sacrilege in an age and culture where hand-decoration is expensive, but it is not an uncommon practice where labour is relatively cheap. The edges have been decorated with an elaborate trimming of metal thread that has been twisted and stitched into a complex floral motif. As the silk has no backing the trimming is floppy and reveals the unsightly tacking stitches that hold the individual metal threads in place. However, this is a presentation gown in which the wearer was expected to stand perfectly still. This style of garment is designed to trail on the floor, with each panel elegantly arranged over and around the woman’s feet. With the bride immobilized in this way, each part of the trimming could be carefully adjusted to create a breathtaking vision of green and gold.

V&A

(via fashionsfromhistory)

Filed under to ruin kings

6,185 notes

Writing Research - The Middle Ages

ghostflowerdreams:

Middle Ages (or Medieval period), lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and merged into the Renaissance and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: Antiquity, Medieval period, and Modern period. The Medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, the High, and the Late Middle Ages. [1] [2]

Names

Society & Life

Commerce

Entertainment & Food

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

Fashion

Dialogue

Justice & Crime

(via thewritershelpers)

Filed under medieval middle ages history

156,609 notes

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

(via unburnt-the-mother-of-dragons)

Filed under body language

3,487 notes

medievalpoc:

laissezferre:

corseque:

Ahhh! This is so cool!

An author was writing historical fiction, and decided (in hopes of escaping anachronistic language) to only use the vocabulary that Jane Austen used. They made a custom dictionary of all the words Jane Austen used in all of her books, and used that to spell check, so it flagged modern words and phrases that she would have totally overlooked otherwise.

I’m thinking it would be incredibly easy to do the same thing for fanfiction, especially book-based - compile a dictionary of, say, all the words GRRM used in ASOIAF, and use that as a spell check dictionary so it would flag any words GRRM did not use…

Or a particular TV show character’s dialogue, though that would involve much more manual effort…

edit: apparently, some historical fiction authors use old dictionaries (circa: 1700-1800s) as their custom dictionaries, even when writing about much earlier time periods. This helps them escape writing with modern-sounding anachronisms that throw modern readers out of the story, but also allows them to use language that a modern reader can understand when writing about time periods where characters should be speaking, say, Old English.

friendly reminder that such a thing has been developed for the les mis fandom 

These are some great resources for authors of historical fiction (and/or fan fiction)!

(via thief-in-the-dark)

Filed under woooooow writing amazing language linguistics

137 notes

shiraglassman:

stirringwind:

Elsa and Anna as Iranian princesses ^^

The reason why their features look different is because I didn’t want to just draw them wearing different clothes but to actually imagine them in an entirely different setting. Their eye colours are a little different- Anna’s eyes would be more hazel-green than the blue-greenish/light teal in canon, and Elsa’s eyes a more blueish-grey. Nonetheless, I kept their hair colours because I wanted them to be different, yet recognisable- and there are people with blonde or red hair in Iran/Central Asia- it’s a very diverse region. Central Asia shows there really isn’t a neat line where Europe ends and Asia begins: modern Iranians, Afghans, Northern Indians and Europeans etc are believed to be descended from a group of people scientists call the Proto-Indo-Europeans, and languages as diverse as Farsi (Persian), Sanskrit and German, English etc all belong to the same Indo-European language family.

For their clothes, I took inspiration from both the Safavid and Qajar eras, and I did take a little artistic license in combining the two. Anna’s colour scheme was based on the green dress she wears to Elsa’s coronation, and Elsa’s palette was kind of a mix of her coronation and ice dress colours. I didn’t strictly adhere to the original colour scheme, and added more golds and yellows because I felt the original colour combinations (especially the cooler maroon + blue colours) don’t work very well with this style of clothing. Also, the warm colours were intended to highlight that it’s a different setting by departing from the original colour palette, which utilised a lot of colder colours ^^

This is great! Great job with the art even apart from the Disney origins.


Since I’ve got some characters with Farsi names (from a made-up place with a made-up religion, tho) in my next book, I might use some of those links for art inspiration myself, later on. (They wound up that way because I let my Iranian friend name them all. And then he waffled for several months on whether I was allowed to mention him in the acknowledgements. He eventually said yes.)

Filed under iran kataya to ruin kings